BAR BUDDY
BAR BUDDY
WHISKEY, BOURBON & SCOTCH
Whiskey is a type of distilled alcoholic beverage made from fermented grain mash. Around the world whiskey or whisky have the same meaning. Various grains and corn (which may be malted) are used for different varieties. Whiskey consist of many classes and types. The typical unifying characteristics of the different classes and types are the fermentation of grains, distillation, and aging in wooden barrels of charred white oak. Irish whiskey must be distilled and aged on the island of Ireland; that is, either in the Republic of Ireland or Northern Ireland The contained spirits must be distilled to an alcohol by volume level of less than 94.8% from a yeast-fermented mash of cereal grains in such a way that the distillate has an aroma and flavour derived from the materials used The product must be aged for at least three years in wooden casks.
Scotch whisky, often simply called Scotch, is malt whisky or grain whisky made in Scotland. Scotch whisky is divided into five distinct categories: single malt Scotch whisky, single grain Scotch whisky, blended malt Scotch whisky, blended grain Scotch whisky, and blended Scotch whisky. All Scotch whisky must be aged in oak barrels for at least three years. Any age statement on a bottle of Scotch whisky, expressed in numerical form, must reflect the age of the youngest whisky used to produce that product. A whisky with an age statement is known as guaranteed-age whisky.
Tennessee whiskey is straight bourbon whiskey produced in Tennessee. However, most current producers of Tennessee whiskey disclaim references to their products as "Bourbon" and do not label them as such on any of their bottles or advertising materials. With one exception, all current producers are required by Tennessee law to produce their whiskey in Tennessee and to also use a filtering step known as the Lincoln County Process prior to aging the whiskey – which some assert makes the product distinct from the more generic product category called Bourbon.
Bourbon whiskey is a type of American whiskey: a barrel-aged distilled spirit made primarily from corn. The name is ultimately derived from the French Bourbon dynasty, although it is disputed whether the namesake Bourbon County in Kentucky or Bourbon Street in New Orleans inspired the whiskey's name. While the liquor may be made anywhere in the United States, it is strongly associated with the American South in general, and Kentucky in particular.
Canadian whisky is a type of whisky produced in Canada. Most Canadian whiskies are blended multi-grain liquors containing a large percentage of corn spirits, and are typically lighter and smoother than other whisky styles. Several hundred years ago, when Canadian distillers began adding small amounts of highly-flavourful rye grain to their mashes people began demanding this new rye-flavoured whisky, referring to it simply as "rye." Today, as for the past two centuries the terms "rye whisky" and "Canadian whisky" are used interchangeably in Canada and refer to exactly the same product.